M7 Priest

M7 preserved at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

Type
Self-propelled artillery

Place of origin
United States

Service history

Used by
U.S. Army
Argentine army
Belgian army
British Army
Canadian Army
Israel Defense Forces
Pakistan Army
Philippine Army
Philippine Constabulary
Taiwanese Army

Production history

Manufacturer
American Locomotive Company (M7)
Pressed Steel Car (M7, M7B1)
Federal Machine and Welder (M7B2)

Produced
April 1942–1945[1]

Number built
M7: 3,490[2] M7B1: 826[1] M7B2: 127[1]

Variants
M7, M7B1, M7B2

Specifications

Weight
50,640 lb (22.97 metric tons)

Length
19 ft 9 in (6.02 m)[1]

Width
9 ft 5 in (2.87 m) with sandshields

Height
8 ft 4 in (2.54 m)[1]
9 ft 8 in (2.95 m) over AA machine gun

Crew
5,[3] 7[4]

Armor
12–62 mm[1]

Main
armament

105 mm M1/M2 Howitzer
69 rounds

Secondary
armament

1 x 0.5 in (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine gun
300 rounds

Engine
Continental R-975 C1
400 or 340 hp
(298 or 254 kW)

Suspension
Vertical volute spring

Operational
range

120 mi (193 km)

Speed
24 mph (39 km/h) on road
15 mph (24 km/h) off road

The 105 mm Howitzer Motor Carriage M7 was an American self-propelled artillery vehicle produced during World War II. It was given the official service name 105 mm Self Propelled Gun, Priest by the British Army, due to the pulpit-like machine gun ring, and following on from the Bishop and the contemporary Deacon self-propelled guns.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Korean War
1.2 Israeli M7 Priests

2 Variants
3 British service self-propelled guns with ecclesiastical names
4 See also
5 Notes
6 References
7 External links

History[edit]
Witnessing the events of the war, U.S. Army observers realized that they would need a self-propelled artillery vehicle with sufficient firepower to support armored operations. Lessons learned with half-tracks (such as the T19 Howitzer Motor Carriage (HMC) with a 105mm howitzer on the M3 Half-track chassis) also showed that this vehicle would have to be armored and fully tracked. It was decided to use the M3 Lee chassis as the basis for this new vehicle design, which was designated T32.[5]

M7 Priest in Carentan, France

The pilot vehicles used the M3 chassis with an open-topped superstructure, mounting an M1A2 105 mm howitzer and, following trials, adding a machine gun, the T32 was accepted for service as the M7 in February
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