Gallium(II) selenide

Names

IUPAC name
Gallium selenide

Other names
Gallium monoselenide

Identifiers

CAS Number

12024-11-2 Y

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

ChemSpider
4887934 Y

ECHA InfoCard
100.031.523

PubChem
6330514

InChI

InChI=1S/Ga.Se Y
Key: QNWMNMIVDYETIG-UHFFFAOYSA-N Y

InChI=1/Ga.Se/rGaSe/c1-2
Key: QNWMNMIVDYETIG-IUSLTFDGAM

SMILES

[Ga]=[Se]

Properties

Chemical formula

GaSe

Molar mass
148.69 g/mol

Appearance
brown solid

Density
5.03 g/cm3

Melting point
960 °C (1,760 °F; 1,230 K)

Band gap
2.1 eV (indirect)

Refractive index (nD)

2.6

Structure

Crystal structure

hexagonal, hP8

Space group

P63/mmc, No. 194

Related compounds

Other anions

Gallium(II) oxide, Gallium(II) sulfide, Gallium(II) telluride

Other cations

Zinc(II) selenide, Germanium monoselenide, Indium monoselenide

Related compounds

Gallium(III) selenide

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Y verify (what is YN ?)

Infobox references

Gallium(II) selenide (GaSe) is a chemical compound. It has a hexagonal layer structure, similar to that of GaS.[1] It is a photoconductor,[2] a second harmonic generation crystal in nonlinear optics,[3] and has been used as a far-infrared conversion material[4] at 14-31 THz and above.[5]

Contents

1 Uses
2 Synthesis
3 References
4 External links

Uses[edit]
It is said to have potential for optical applications[6] but the exploitation of this potential has been limited by the ability to readily grow single crystals [7] Gallium selenide crystals show great promise as a nonlinear optical material and photoconductor. Non-linear optical materials are used in the frequency conversion of laser light. Frequency conversion involves the shifting of the wavelength of a monochromatic source of light, usually laser light, to a higher or lower wavelength of light that cannot be produced from a conventional laser source.
Several methods of frequency conversion using non-linear optical materials exist. Second harmonic generation leads to doubling of the frequency of infrared carbon dioxide lasers. In optical parametric generation, the wavelength of light is doubled. Near-infrared solid-state lasers are usually used in optical parametric generations.[8]
One original problem with using gallium selenide in
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